Tips

You searched for soup and found 11 tips.

  • Cabbage: Using & Storing – Do you know how to use cabbage? How about storing it? This tip will teach you how to do both things, so you can make the most of the harvest! Read more →
  • Celery – Celery is more than just crunch, it is also contains apigenin, a chemical that potentially helps to fight breast cancer according to a University of Missouri study. Learn more about how to cook and store this veggie from this tip taken from Asparagus to Zucchini. Read more →
  • Chiffonade – Chiffonade is a way to chop greens so they look elegant and are easy to incorporate in to salads, soups, and more. Read more →
  • Fennel – Fennel is very complimentary to other foods, especially seafoods and citrus. It adds a great zing and crunch to tuna salad; it adds depth and flavor to grilled or roasted fish—pretty much any kind of fish. Read more →
  • Garlic Scapes – Garlic scapes are the flower bud of the garlic plant. The bud is removed in late June to encourage the bulbs to thicken up. Scapes make a fabulous addition to a flower bouquet, and they are delicious to eat! Read more →
  • Heirloom Tomatoes – During tomato season, we have fruits in every color of the rainbow. Learn about their uses, tastes, and histories! Read more →
  • Our Fresh Dried Beans! – Get to know all of the varieties that we grow and some yummy recipes to use these heirloom varieties of dry beans. Read more →
  • Planting Garlic – As the winters get shorter, we plant our garlic later. It used to be late September as the nights begin to cool and the light fades, but these days the best time to plant your garlic in the northern New England climate is more like mid October to early November. Encouraging strong root growth before the freeze helps to sustain healthy and vigorous spring growth. Seeing the first garlic shoots in the spring is one of our earliest spring green pleasures on the farm. Read more →
  • Removing Tomato Skins – To can or freeze tomatoes, or to make sauce or soup it is best to remove the tomato skins (and seeds) before doing so. Tomato skins and seeds are harder to digest and they do not cook down like the flesh does and will appear as seeds and strips of skin in your finished product. Blanching loosens the skin so that it can be easily removed. Read more →
  • Tomatillos – Is it a tomato or something different? Tomatillos are a unique vegetable that come at the peak of the late summer harvest. They are so delicious if you know how to prepare them! Read more →

← More