Gardening

  • Use a Trap Crop To Control Japanese Beetles – The Japanese beetle will happily consume over 300 species of plants, although they particularly love roses. Adult beetles will travel great distances to eat the soft parts of the leaves, leaving them looking almost skeletal. This tip focuses on using evening primrose as a trap crop. Read more →
  • Getting the most from your basil – If you pinch the growing tips of your basil throughout the growing season, you’ll get a bushy plant that will keep producing lush, tasty leaves all season long. Read more →
  • How and When To Cut Your Garlic Scapes – Those pretty spiral stems that form above your garlic in June are edible. By removing them you’ll improve your garlic harvest! Read more →
  • Succession Planting – Succession planting is a way to make the most of the space in your garden and always have tender, ripe crops to eat. Learn some tips from Cat about extending the harvest window in your garden for a variety of crops. This can also give you a little relief if you feel stressed about getting your garden in all at once. You aren’t late, you’re succession planting. Read more →
  • Fertilizing Young Plants – Memorial day weekend is traditionally the time to plant the warm weather garden crops like tomatoes, beans, cucumbers, melons, squash, peppers, eggplant, basil, lavender, rosemary, and all the other tender annual flowers, herbs, and veggies. Young bedding plants do best with a fertilizer boost when planting. Read on to learn more about fertilizing young plants. Read more →
  • Hardening Off Plants – Remember to harden off your plants! Any plants you buy from inside of a greenhouse have not been hardened off, those that are sold from outside have likely been conditioned to the cold weather and are ready to be outside. Read more →
  • Early Planting – Here are some tips on getting on start on early plantings. Learn about crops that are less risky to plant early, and also some tricks that can help you protect your plants on those often cold spring nights. Read more →
  • Winter Squash: Saving Seed – Winter squash has harder skin than summer squash does; their flesh is firmer too and so needs to cook longer.  The seeds are fully developed when the squash is ready to eat, whereas summer squash needs to be left on the vine well past the eating stage to complete the development of its seed. There are some technicalities to saving seeds from these squash. Read more →
  • Planting Garlic – As the winters get shorter, we plant our garlic later. It used to be late September as the nights begin to cool and the light fades, but these days the best time to plant your garlic in the northern New England climate is more like mid October to early November. Encouraging strong root growth before the freeze helps to sustain healthy and vigorous spring growth. Seeing the first garlic shoots in the spring is one of our earliest spring green pleasures on the farm. Read more →
  • Harvesting and Curing Garlic – Are the bottom three to five leaves on your garlic brown, with a few green leaves toward the top? It’s time to harvest! Read more →

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