Tips

You searched for weeds and found 20 tips.

  • Geotextiles: Olive Plastic or IRT – Olive plastic is the latest development in plastic mulch technology, offering a hybrid between clear and black mulches. Read more →
  • Geotextiles: Row Cover or Reemay Cloth – In the Northeast, row cover is a farmer’s best friend. Read more to find out how you can benefit from using this geotextile in your home garden. Read more →
  • Geotextiles: Silver Plastic – Aluminum reflective mulch has similar uses to black plastic mulch, however it posses some unique properties. Read more →
  • Pest: Flea Beetles – Flea Beetles are tiny little shiny, black beetle that hop away when you approach plants. Read more →
  • Pest: Leafhopper – If your legume leaves are turning yellow, potato leaves are turning brown or your rose leaves are stippled with white, you might have leafhoppers. Read more →
  • Pest: Rose Chafer – These beetle-like bugs are very common. Unfortunately they are not friends. They can skeletonize the leaves of your plants quickly and thoroughly. Read more →
  • Pest: Slugs – Wet weather brings slugs which wreak havoc on your plants close to the ground, especially those that are very moist like lettuce, cabbage, and many other greens. Read more →
  • Planting Garlic – As the winters get shorter, we plant our garlic later. It used to be late September as the nights begin to cool and the light fades, but these days the best time to plant your garlic in the northern New England climate is more like mid October to early November. Encouraging strong root growth before the freeze helps to sustain healthy and vigorous spring growth. Seeing the first garlic shoots in the spring is one of our earliest spring green pleasures on the farm. Read more →
  • Purslane: All About It – Purslane (portulaca oleracea) or “little hogweed”, is a low sprawling succulent weed that you’ll find growing in your garden, all over your lawn, and even in sidewalk cracks. While the USDA classifies purslane as a “noxious weed”, this succulent herb is not only edible—it’s packed full of nutrients! Read more →
  • Use a Trap Crop To Control Japanese Beetles – The Japanese beetle will happily consume over 300 species of plants, although they particularly love roses. Adult beetles will travel great distances to eat the soft parts of the leaves, leaving them looking almost skeletal. This tip focuses on using evening primrose as a trap crop. Read more →

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