Tips

You searched for harvest and found 29 tips.

  • Planting Garlic – As the winters get shorter, we plant our garlic later. It used to be late September as the nights begin to cool and the light fades, but these days the best time to plant your garlic in the northern New England climate is more like mid October to early November. Encouraging strong root growth before the freeze helps to sustain healthy and vigorous spring growth. Seeing the first garlic shoots in the spring is one of our earliest spring green pleasures on the farm. Read more →
  • Saving Seeds – Seed saving is a fun way to bring your gardening talents to the next level! Empower yourself and follow these simple tips to save seeds from some common and simple-to-process vegetables. Read more →
  • Staking Tomatoes – We highly recommend staking and training tomatoes early, while they are small. If you wait until they flop, you risk breaking the tender stalks. Read more →
  • Succession Planting – Succession planting is a way to make the most of the space in your garden and always have tender, ripe crops to eat. Learn some tips from Cat about extending the harvest window in your garden for a variety of crops. This can also give you a little relief if you feel stressed about getting your garden in all at once. You aren’t late, you’re succession planting. Read more →
  • Thinning Seedlings – Thinning your seedlings in the vegetable patch can be one of the most difficult jobs to do because it makes the gardener feel like a killer of the very seedlings we worked so hard to grow. However, if you do not thin your crops now while they are little, your harvest will suffer. Read more →
  • Tomatillos – Is it a tomato or something different? Tomatillos are a unique vegetable that come at the peak of the late summer harvest. They are so delicious if you know how to prepare them! Read more →
  • Tomato Seed Saving – Saving seeds from your tomatoes is a great way to learn about the tradition of seed saving. Easy! Read more →
  • Winter Squash: Saving Seed – Winter squash has harder skin than summer squash does; their flesh is firmer too and so needs to cook longer.  The seeds are fully developed when the squash is ready to eat, whereas summer squash needs to be left on the vine well past the eating stage to complete the development of its seed. There are some technicalities to saving seeds from these squash. Read more →
  • Winter Squash: Storage Tips – When buying squash for storage, it is important to find the unblemished fruit. Any little ding will only get worse in storage and will affect the quality of other squash as well. Most varieties store well in the pantry through much of winter. Squash are easy to grow in Vermont too, if you have the space for them. And if you don’t, not to worry because undoubtedly someone you know grew too much. Read more →

More →