Tips

You searched for harvest and found 28 tips.

  • Brussels Sprouts : Tips from Seed to Harvest – These nutritious miniature cabbages are often under celebrated and even disliked. Don’t give up on them though! It is well worth noting that often store bought Brussels sprouts are picked too early – it shows in their bitter flavor and tough texture. Picking them fresh from the farm or garden after a few frosts sweetens the flavor and makes them tender, offering a whole different experience! Read more →
  • Cabbage: All About It… – In the fall, the farm is inundated with cabbage! It is delicious and nutritious and abundant so get acquainted with it here! Read more →
  • Cabbage: Using & Storing – Do you know how to use cabbage? How about storing it? This tip will teach you how to do both things, so you can make the most of the harvest! Read more →
  • Companion Planting – Companion plants help each other to grow in some way. For instance, some plants can extract certain nutrients from the soil and make them more available for other plants. Read more →
  • Compost: Turn food waste into soil nutrients! – Compost is an important soil amendment made of decomposed plant matter including food scraps. You can make right it in your backyard! With the right recipe, your compost heap will not omit bad odors, will lighten the load (and cost) of your trash, and will greatly reduce greenhouse gas emissions from landfills. Adding compost to soil helps to restore the organic matter content allowing for greater moisture and nutrient retention and providing necessary food for essential microorganisms that live in healthy soil. Read more →
  • Deadheading Flowers – Deadheading your flowers—pulling or clipping spent blossoms off—will ensure better blooms throughout the season. Read more →
  • Dry Bean Seed Saving – Saving seed from dry beans could not be easier! Read more →
  • Drying Herbs – June-July is the perfect time to go out and collect herbs to dry for tea and spices. Read more →
  • Geotextiles: Insect Netting – Insect netting is a thin fabric, similar to row cover yet thinner and more porous. Use insect netting on crops with great pest or bird pressure where there is no need to insulate the crop. Read more →
  • Geotextiles: Row Cover or Reemay Cloth – In the Northeast, row cover is a farmer’s best friend. Read more to find out how you can benefit from using this geotextile in your home garden. Read more →

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