Tips

You searched for tomatoes and found 23 tips.

  • Pest: Aphid – Aphids are a common tiny pear-shaped, soft-bodied insect up to 1/8” long. They are usually found in masses feeding on flowers and crops. Read more →
  • Pest: Cucumber Beetles – Cucumber beetles are a small, yellow, oval beetle, smaller and more oval than a potato beetle. There are two types: the spotted cucumber is yellow with black stripes; the spotted cucumber beetle is yellow with black spots. Read more →
  • Pest: Hornworm Caterpillar – Hornworm caterpillars are a pest. They can get huge while munching on your tomato plants. The best method for control in the home garden is hand picking. Understanding their lifecycle is a good place to start. Read more →
  • Pest: Slugs – Wet weather brings slugs which wreak havoc on your plants close to the ground, especially those that are very moist like lettuce, cabbage, and many other greens. Read more →
  • Pest: Squash Bug – Even though they have the most gorgeous eggs, you don’t want to find these on the undersides of your squash plants. Find out about the ways to keep these bugs at bay using natural methods and processes. Read more →
  • Planting Tomatoes – Planting tomatoes properly can be a bit of a mystery. Start with a hole about 10-12 inches deep. Read more →
  • Preserving Blueberries – Learn a few simple ways to put up your favorite blue berry. Read more →
  • Removing Tomato Skins – To can or freeze tomatoes, or to make sauce or soup it is best to remove the tomato skins (and seeds) before doing so. Tomato skins and seeds are harder to digest and they do not cook down like the flesh does and will appear as seeds and strips of skin in your finished product. Blanching loosens the skin so that it can be easily removed. Read more →
  • Saving Seeds – Seed saving is a fun way to bring your gardening talents to the next level! Empower yourself and follow these simple tips to save seeds from some common and simple-to-process vegetables. Read more →
  • Staking Tomatoes – We highly recommend staking and training tomatoes early, while they are small. If you wait until they flop, you risk breaking the tender stalks. Read more →

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