Tips

You searched for insects and found 30 tips.

  • Pest: Hornworm Caterpillar – Hornworm caterpillars are a pest. They can get huge while munching on your tomato plants. The best method for control in the home garden is hand picking. Understanding their lifecycle is a good place to start. Read more →
  • Pest: Japanese Beetle – Adult Japanese beetles are iridescent green with copper wing covers and are, unfortunately, very common in gardens in mid-summer. Read more →
  • Pest: Leafhopper – If your legume leaves are turning yellow, potato leaves are turning brown or your rose leaves are stippled with white, you might have leafhoppers. Read more →
  • Pest: Root Maggot – Root maggots particularly plague Brassica crops, able to detect easily your newly planted and delicate seedlings. Stop them before they become established! Read more →
  • Pest: Rose Chafer – These beetle-like bugs are very common. Unfortunately they are not friends. They can skeletonize the leaves of your plants quickly and thoroughly. Read more →
  • Pest: Squash Bug – Even though they have the most gorgeous eggs, you don’t want to find these on the undersides of your squash plants. Find out about the ways to keep these bugs at bay using natural methods and processes. Read more →
  • Pest: Wireworm – Ever find potatoes with wriggly holes inside? This is probably wireworm damage. Read more →
  • Saving Seeds – Seed saving is a fun way to bring your gardening talents to the next level! Empower yourself and follow these simple tips to save seeds from some common and simple-to-process vegetables. Read more →
  • Use a Trap Crop To Control Japanese Beetles – The Japanese beetle will happily consume over 300 species of plants, although they particularly love roses. Adult beetles will travel great distances to eat the soft parts of the leaves, leaving them looking almost skeletal. This tip focuses on using evening primrose as a trap crop. Read more →
  • Winter Squash: Saving Seed – Winter squash has harder skin than summer squash does; their flesh is firmer too and so needs to cook longer.  The seeds are fully developed when the squash is ready to eat, whereas summer squash needs to be left on the vine well past the eating stage to complete the development of its seed. There are some technicalities to saving seeds from these squash. Read more →

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