Tips

You searched for roots and found 20 tips.

  • Pest: Flea Beetles – Flea Beetles are tiny little shiny, black beetle that hop away when you approach plants. Read more →
  • Pest: Japanese Beetle – Adult Japanese beetles are iridescent green with copper wing covers and are, unfortunately, very common in gardens in mid-summer. Read more →
  • Pest: Root Maggot – Root maggots particularly plague Brassica crops, able to detect easily your newly planted and delicate seedlings. Stop them before they become established! Read more →
  • Pest: Rose Chafer – These beetle-like bugs are very common. Unfortunately they are not friends. They can skeletonize the leaves of your plants quickly and thoroughly. Read more →
  • Pest: Wireworm – Ever find potatoes with wriggly holes inside? This is probably wireworm damage. Read more →
  • Planting Garlic – As the winters get shorter, we plant our garlic later. It used to be late September as the nights begin to cool and the light fades, but these days the best time to plant your garlic in the northern New England climate is more like mid October to early November. Encouraging strong root growth before the freeze helps to sustain healthy and vigorous spring growth. Seeing the first garlic shoots in the spring is one of our earliest spring green pleasures on the farm. Read more →
  • Planting Tomatoes – Planting tomatoes properly can be a bit of a mystery. Start with a hole about 10-12 inches deep. Read more →
  • Potatoes: Storage Tips – Storing food in small amounts is easy, but in larger quantities it can be tricky in our increasingly energy efficient homes. Here are some tips for storing potatoes. Read more →
  • Thinning Seedlings – Thinning your seedlings in the vegetable patch can be one of the most difficult jobs to do because it makes the gardener feel like a killer of the very seedlings we worked so hard to grow. However, if you do not thin your crops now while they are little, your harvest will suffer. Read more →
  • Winter Squash: Storage Tips – When buying squash for storage, it is important to find the unblemished fruit. Any little ding will only get worse in storage and will affect the quality of other squash as well. Most varieties store well in the pantry through much of winter. Squash are easy to grow in Vermont too, if you have the space for them. And if you don’t, not to worry because undoubtedly someone you know grew too much. Read more →

More →