Pests

  • Beneficial Insect: Lacewing – These beautiful, slender insects are attracted to lights and are commonly found clinging to window screens at night. But don’t swat them… they’re a big help in the garden. Read more →
  • Pest: Hornworm Caterpillar – Hornworm caterpillars are a pest. They can get huge while munching on your tomato plants. The best method for control in the home garden is hand picking. Understanding their lifecycle is a good place to start. Read more →
  • Beneficial Insect: Syrphid Fly or Hover Fly – These guys are your friends! Adult hover flies resemble small wasps, with a black and yellow or white striped abdomen. They will hover like a hummingbird as they drink nectar from flowers. Hover flies do not sting. They range in size from 1/4” to 1/2” depending on the species. The adults are the pollinators and its the larvae that consume pests. Read more →
  • Pest: Cabbage Worm – Cabbage worms are very common on cabbage plants and their relatives. Often times you spot their damage before their camouflaged bodies. Read more →
  • Pest: Aphid – Aphids are a common tiny pear-shaped, soft-bodied insect up to 1/8” long. They are usually found in masses feeding on flowers and crops. Read more →
  • Pest: Japanese Beetle – Adult Japanese beetles are iridescent green with copper wing covers and are, unfortunately, very common in gardens in mid-summer. Read more →
  • Pest: Slugs – Wet weather brings slugs which wreak havoc on your plants close to the ground, especially those that are very moist like lettuce, cabbage, and many other greens. Read more →
  • Pest: Flea Beetles – Flea Beetles are tiny little shiny, black beetle that hop away when you approach plants. Read more →
  • Geotextiles: Row Cover or Reemay Cloth – In the Northeast, row cover is a farmer’s best friend. Read more to find out how you can benefit from using this geotextile in your home garden. Read more →
  • Pest: Leafhopper – If your legume leaves are turning yellow, potato leaves are turning brown or your rose leaves are stippled with white, you might have leafhoppers. Read more →

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